Archives for editing

What’s your crutch word?

I don’t know if it’s just me or other authors also have a certain word that they inadvertently repeat while writing. After I wrote my very first draft, I realized that my crutch word was ‘felt‘. My editor had pointed it out to me. I understand that writing is best done spontaneously and not if you are constantly aware of what you might be doing wrong. It disturbs the flow if you write consciously. However, while self-editing, one should be aware of their crutch words (if any). While revising your script you can then easily do a search on those
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Knowing When It’s Time to Bring in an Editor

“Writing without revising is the literary equivalent of waltzing gaily out of the house in your underwear.” —Patricia Fuller    Editing is something that we all do almost daily. From blog posts to a book chapter, a grocery list to an email, proofreading and revising is an important step. If you want the best results for your writing, you need to edit your work. No matter your industry or audience, typos are going to set you back a few paces, not to mention more egregious errors like inconsistencies in information or plot. Simply put, errors show that you’re not paying attention and that you
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8 Tips for Polishing Your Fiction

I always enjoy working on draft 2. Sure, draft 1 can be full of surprises, discovery and moments of brilliance (or least if feels like brilliance at the time) but it can also be quite a taxing task. Draft 2 is more like the second time you make a new recipe: you’ve worked out what works and what doesn’t and can’t wait to try it again, this time with fewer mistakes. That’s not to say that drafts 3 to 3,000 won’t have their moments of difficulty, but they exist to continuously refine what drafts 1 and 2 have established. Now,
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My Writing Process: Revealed!

“Where do you get your ideas?” is the most-asked question of creative people. I’ve been paying attention to my own #writing process since people started asking me that more often. I now know I have three distinct phases for my creative process, but they are not entirely linear in sequence. Without even consciously knowing I am in it, I am often in the incubation period, phase one for all creative endeavors. This assumes ground zero is pre-phase one, the part in which I determine I’m open to creating and what I want to create, in a general way. For me, the incubation period is highly receptive. I am like
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Guest Post: Inspirational Post for Indie Writers

This week has been an unusually difficult week for me.  It is so close to the release of my debut novel, Ravenous, that I am getting opening night jitters.  Like a tech week from hell, I hope that my bad dress rehearsal means a successful dress. (Sorry for the bad theatre puns, I come from that world) It all began with some very negative, maybe constructive criticism of my book, just two weeks away from release.  I know that not everyone will love it (or like it, might even hate it) but the critique meant a whole new restructuring of
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Editing—Bane of a Writer’s Existence

There is no fast and easy way when it comes to a writer editing their manuscripts.   We have to take solace though, knowing we can type our work out. What if we had to still write on stone or wood, or use ink and a feather. Our books would take for-ever to write. And editing that work…we could forget about it. Funny enough, it seems to be easier to edit the work of others and my kids’ favorite one–correcting their grammar. With the increase of editing and grammar software, one might think the editing woes are over. Not so fast…because as writers
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Wordiness – Cutting Until It’s Right

Good writing is concise writing. That means cutting and editing until you’ve said exactly what you want to say without extra words or phrases or saying things.   How do you go about doing this? Well, lets see how we can correct wordiness. The book The Least You Should Know About English is the perfect “go to” book for finding information about wordiness. There are several examples of wordiness that we can learn from:   1. Don’t say something in ten words when five can do.   “At the present time” should be “at present” or “now” “In this day and age”
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I Heard You the First Time

…Repetition as enemy to style and cadence. Even great writers make mistakes. I can usually tell when it’s an editing oversight, or the fault of the author. An editor’s oversight seems a simultaneous contradiction, in that it can mean “overlook”, but also “seeing-over,” as in monitoring–same word, two opposite meanings. Accordingly, when I use the word “mistake” in this context, it doesn’t necessarily imply the condition of being WRONG. I use the word, “mistake” loosely. What I’m really talking about are stylistic errors. But telling someone how to have a writing style, is like telling someone how to have clothing
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Writing Tips: To Know, To Begin, To Feel

As a writer, I am always in training. Like any vocation, it can be mastered to some degree if the individual cares enough about it. One thing I have noticed along the way, is that I have used certain phrases and words which do not serve the story in quality, plot or character development, or even in achieving clean, sharp examples of good craft. Most of these examples refer to rough drafts, as I have been writing for 25 years, and cannot be excused for doing this in a final version, but still, it comes up in the editing process
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Branch Out & Barter Your Way to a Better Book

I am an indie writer, which is simply a spiffy phrase for being self-published. Why I chose this route is another story, but the bottom line is, I am on the hook for it all. In addition to writing my snippets of suspense, I also have to make sure the book is edited, designed, marketed and sold. I don’t know about you, but all of that stuff is much more daunting to me than the actual writing of the book! ON TENTERHOOKS was my first novel and that means that writing for me occupies that nebulous space between engaging hobby
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