Monthly Archives June 2013

What’s your excuse?

I earned my black belt in Thai kickboxing Friday night. Yes, this will tie into writing. I began my training in late 2008 without any fat, muscle, or awareness of my exercise-induced asthma. My inability to breathe properly sort of snuck past me for more than a quarter-century. At first, I assumed I was in terrible shape, and that was likely part of the equation, but then my endurance became more erratic. Some days, I’d get through the class with energy to spare. Other days, especially really hot or cold days, I’d feel out of breath in five minutes. I saw my
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My 9 Worst Writing Habits

We all have bad habits, yet you can only really change them if you admit to them.  As the author of 1.12 million words in the To Be Sinclair series, with seven books up on Amazon and Smashwords, one coming out June 30th, and 2/3 done with the finale to the series, I’d like to think I’ve isolated my bad habits and am changing them as best I can.  It’s not always easy to do, and sometimes not necessary, but my purpose is to whittle them down so they do not plague me and I can get more writing done.  Some of them may seem
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Ground your sci-fi

Science fiction is fun. You can do all sorts of wondrous things that aren’t yet possible in real life and might never be. Want to teleport? Build a sentient robot? Journey to the center of a molecule? Go for it! But let’s not get too carried away. To paraphrase a theme of The Incredibles, if everything’s special, then nothing is. Contrasts are key. Avoid the “anything goes” mentality. Give your world or universe rules, and establish those expectations early. Otherwise, you’ll wind up like 1950s Superman — constantly gaining new powers as the plot demands. Your unique rules will distinguish
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Realm Rhythm Part 1—Creating Fantasy Languages

At some point, fiction writers, writing of fantastical lands, magical, futuristic and space realms may ponder having a fantasy language shared between certain characters. Creating a fantasy language can no doubt be difficult, just as learning a foreign language can be…especially if the writer needs extensive dialogue spoken in said language. Pros and cons: Pro—A challenge to create unique and wonderful languages, gathering a huge fan following for your “realm speak” like Tolkien did with his Elvish. Con—It can intimidate the writer into navigating away from the idea of spicing up the writing that might otherwise give the realm more merit with a fantasy-based language
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